A MECHANIC from Kirkbymoorside has found his new passion.

Rob Temple, 39, is a mechanic at Cropton Garage and when he’s not fixing cars he can now be found producing all kinds of drawings.

Rob started drawing in October 2021 after borrowing some crayons from his friend’s 10-year-old daughter, Jessica Greetham.

“I might not have started it if she didn’t have the crayons – I hadn’t thought about it,” he said.

Rob and Jessica worked together on the initial drawings, producing three together.

Gazette & Herald: Rob is a mechanic at Cropton Garage and his first drawing was of a car's engine Picture: Dylan ConnellRob is a mechanic at Cropton Garage and his first drawing was of a car's engine Picture: Dylan Connell

Since his early work with Jessica, Rob has now completed 59 artworks.

The drawings have been well receieved and even caught the attention of local artists Kezy Feaster and Phil Magson.

Some of the artwork will be on display this Sunday (June 26) at the New Inn, in Cropton, from 2pm to celebrate his 40th birthday.

Rob described the art as mainly abstract ‘doodles’ with little meaning behind them.

Gazette & Herald: Rob Temple has described his artwork as 'abstract' and has now completed 59 drawingsRob Temple has described his artwork as 'abstract' and has now completed 59 drawings

Some pieces, however, have taken on deeper meanings.

Rob experimented with pastels to produce a drawing of his late grandmother and cat who died in 2020 and 2021.

He also honoured his friend, David Drake, who died suddenly aged 34 in 2016 with a drawing.

After David’s death Rob was gifted a yellow shirt of David’s to remember him.

An altercation came after wearing the shirt to a pub, and instead of retaliating Rob said “I walked away and done a picture for Dave.

“Now all my mates want one of them – so I’ve done prints.”

Gazette & Herald: Rob said uses crayons rather than other art methods because they allow him to 'scribble'Rob said uses crayons rather than other art methods because they allow him to 'scribble'

Rob gifted another friend, Ben Dale, a painting as a marriage present.

Ben had a stroke at 18-years-old which left him paralysed in a wheelchair.

Rob said: “(Ben’s) a real inspiration because most people would have given up.”

Despite Rob’s ability to connect his drawings with deeper meanings, he explained that he has never classed himself as an artist or an art fan.

Gazette & Herald: Rob's early drawings were produced on old wallpaper, but he now uses card from Bentley Antony picture framers in KirkbymoorsideRob's early drawings were produced on old wallpaper, but he now uses card from Bentley Antony picture framers in Kirkbymoorside

He said he even fails to fully appreciate his own work.

“People can see things that I can’t see.

“When I’m finished a drawing, I look at it for an hour or two and think, what was I doing there – what’s happening?” Said Rob.

Rob has received some offers for his drawings but said he wants drawing to stay a hobby.

“How much are they for sale Rob?” Asked Rob’s dad, Geoff.

“They’re not for sale, they’re mine!” Replied Rob.

“I would sell them; I just need someone rich enough and daft enough – I’m not setting a base line yet.” He said.

His mum, Lesley, said she appreciates the way Rob uses colours – often dark and contrasting with each other – but dislikes some aspects of the illustrations.

“He does draw awful creepy crawlies,” joked Lesley.

 

Gazette & Herald: Rob will display the pictures this Sunday (June 26) to celebrate his 40th birthday. Pictured: Rob Temple, Lesley Temple, Geoff Temple, and the family's cat Albert Picture: Dylan ConnellRob will display the pictures this Sunday (June 26) to celebrate his 40th birthday. Pictured: Rob Temple, Lesley Temple, Geoff Temple, and the family's cat Albert Picture: Dylan Connell

As Rob started drawing more, he fell onto broken glass and suffered nerve and tendon damage, which resulted in him losing feeling in his dominant left hand.

This forced Rob to switch to his weaker right hand and learn to draw again.

He has only just started using his left hand again.

By using just one hand Rob said he was unable to do simple tasks, explaining that he had to ask others to sharpen his crayons for him.

“I was totally debilitated,” he said.

Gazette & Herald: The artwork has recently caught the attention of local artists Kezy Feaster and Phil Magson Picture: Dylan ConnellThe artwork has recently caught the attention of local artists Kezy Feaster and Phil Magson Picture: Dylan Connell

Rob’s first memories of drawing are at his school, Lady Lumley’s School in Pickering, where he produced some drawings in his first two years and never returned to them.

Following Rob’s 30-year absence from art, he got in touch with his school art teacher, Mrs Annie Chaddock, to show her his new work.

Mrs Chaddock remembered Rob.

His mum, Lesley, teased that this was “for all the wrong reasons.”

Despite this, Rob and Mrs Chaddock are now in contact and talk about his artwork.

Rob has even invited Mrs Chaddock to Sunday’s exhibit where he will gift her a drawing that she praised.

The artwork is now a huge part of Rob’s life.

He said: “Everyone keeps asking for them.

“It all started as a joke really.”

Pointing at one of his drawings Rob said: “(Now) I just want to go and finish that one.”

Gazette & Herald: The artwork has been praised for its use of bright, bold coloursThe artwork has been praised for its use of bright, bold colours