Plans to close little used stations in North Yorkshire

Patrick McLoughlin

Patrick McLoughlin

First published in News
Last updated

RAIL services at some of North Yorkshire's “little-used” stations are under threat under new Government plans.

Ministers are proposing cutting the number of trains that serve 67 stops with “particularly low levels of use”, when a new contract is brought in for a private operator, including ten in North Yorkshire,

Stations that attract fewer than ten passengers a day on average include Ruswarp, Battersby and Kildale.

The proposal is included in plans for the new Northern Rail and Trans-Pennine franchises, which are due to be awarded late next year and to start in February 2016.

A consultation for the franchise seeks support for improving the quality of the trains “at the expense of some reduction in lightly used services”.

The department for transport (DfT) has vowed that 30-year-old ‘Pacer’ trains – condemned as “cattle trucks” by critics – will finally be replaced, as part of the new contract.

The DfT has already warned that rail fares may have to soar to pay for the new trains, regardless of whether some services are culled at less popular stations.

Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin insisted that no decisions have yet been taken on the proposals in the document, arguing it was normal to seek views in a consultation.

Comments (13)

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8:13am Mon 28 Jul 14

pedalling paul says...

Far simpler to make these request stops. Michael Portillo showed us what do do on the Conwy Valley line..stick your hand out.
Far simpler to make these request stops. Michael Portillo showed us what do do on the Conwy Valley line..stick your hand out. pedalling paul
  • Score: 30

8:20am Mon 28 Jul 14

Cheeky face says...

Request stops and halts are an option, but still the infrequent use intimated in the article may not justify this as it would probably affect timetables. What about safety!
Request stops and halts are an option, but still the infrequent use intimated in the article may not justify this as it would probably affect timetables. What about safety! Cheeky face
  • Score: -12

8:27am Mon 28 Jul 14

MrsHoney says...

Nothing like encouraging us to use public transport. There need to be more stations not less if they're serious about people giving up their cars. Sure it's not many people but many a mickle and all that!!
Nothing like encouraging us to use public transport. There need to be more stations not less if they're serious about people giving up their cars. Sure it's not many people but many a mickle and all that!! MrsHoney
  • Score: 36

9:02am Mon 28 Jul 14

smudge2 says...

Is this the return of the ghost of Dr Beeching ??
Is this the return of the ghost of Dr Beeching ?? smudge2
  • Score: 22

9:57am Mon 28 Jul 14

bolero says...

The thin end of the wedge probably. Total closure of the line? Couldn't it be possible that people don't use these trains because they are like cattle trucks. Would it not be wiser to wait and see if the proposed new rolling stock proves more attractive before closing stations?
The thin end of the wedge probably. Total closure of the line? Couldn't it be possible that people don't use these trains because they are like cattle trucks. Would it not be wiser to wait and see if the proposed new rolling stock proves more attractive before closing stations? bolero
  • Score: 24

12:53pm Mon 28 Jul 14

Stevie D says...

Can anyone find the DfT report with these proposals? I've had a look but can't see anything.

There are some stations that I can see would be worthwhile closing - Chathill and Teesside Airport are two that immediately spring to mind, where they really don't add any value to the network - but a lot of the others listed, including those along the Esk Valley Railway, would be really short-sighted to close. For a start, in most cases there is no alternative public transport to those villages, so there would be a public cost for subsidised buses to run to them (including school buses). For a second, unless the line itself is going to be closed, which in the case of Esk Valley is highly unlikely, I don't see that significant sums of money are likely to be saved by closing stations along it.
Can anyone find the DfT report with these proposals? I've had a look but can't see anything. There are some stations that I can see would be worthwhile closing - Chathill and Teesside Airport are two that immediately spring to mind, where they really don't add any value to the network - but a lot of the others listed, including those along the Esk Valley Railway, would be really short-sighted to close. For a start, in most cases there is no alternative public transport to those villages, so there would be a public cost for subsidised buses to run to them (including school buses). For a second, unless the line itself is going to be closed, which in the case of Esk Valley is highly unlikely, I don't see that significant sums of money are likely to be saved by closing stations along it. Stevie D
  • Score: 13

1:28pm Mon 28 Jul 14

Dr Brian says...

Rail use is at its highest levels than it has been in years. But what does this Government suggest. Close stations. Why not invest in promoting these stations - get people out of cars etc far more greener but of course the Tories and Lib Dems have not got any green policies!
Rail use is at its highest levels than it has been in years. But what does this Government suggest. Close stations. Why not invest in promoting these stations - get people out of cars etc far more greener but of course the Tories and Lib Dems have not got any green policies! Dr Brian
  • Score: 9

1:29pm Mon 28 Jul 14

Alf Garnett says...

Good grief, this is astonishing. First, the request stop model for rural railways works successfully elsewhere and the timetable can factor these likely stops in. Second, when rail use overall is increasing and stations are being reopened in an effort to reduce car commuting, here we have some real 1950s thinking. Those ten or so journeys would presumably have to be made by car, as buses won't be viable or reliable anyway. Whittle away the small stations, reduce the overall usage and pretty soon you close the line. I bet this wouldn't happen in Scotland.
Good grief, this is astonishing. First, the request stop model for rural railways works successfully elsewhere and the timetable can factor these likely stops in. Second, when rail use overall is increasing and stations are being reopened in an effort to reduce car commuting, here we have some real 1950s thinking. Those ten or so journeys would presumably have to be made by car, as buses won't be viable or reliable anyway. Whittle away the small stations, reduce the overall usage and pretty soon you close the line. I bet this wouldn't happen in Scotland. Alf Garnett
  • Score: 10

1:59pm Mon 28 Jul 14

franthom says...

The train has to stop at Battersby because the driver has to walk to the other end of the train to continue the journey. Any passengers could alight/disembark whilst this is happening - so what is the advantage in closing the station?
The train has to stop at Battersby because the driver has to walk to the other end of the train to continue the journey. Any passengers could alight/disembark whilst this is happening - so what is the advantage in closing the station? franthom
  • Score: 22

3:36pm Mon 28 Jul 14

barcooter says...

It doesn't say anywhere in the piece or any of the quotes from the DfT that there are any plans to close stations, only reduce the services. This headline was concocted in order to provoke a reaction. Lazy journalism.
It doesn't say anywhere in the piece or any of the quotes from the DfT that there are any plans to close stations, only reduce the services. This headline was concocted in order to provoke a reaction. Lazy journalism. barcooter
  • Score: 8

8:52pm Mon 28 Jul 14

Cheeky face says...

Battersby and Kildale are close to each other, so one to keep and one to go is the option to look at. As per earlier comments if the train has a need to stop at Battersby that looks favourite.

Change in travel culture I am afraid. Forge Valley station had 60000 visitors 50/60 years ago. Time moves on.
Battersby and Kildale are close to each other, so one to keep and one to go is the option to look at. As per earlier comments if the train has a need to stop at Battersby that looks favourite. Change in travel culture I am afraid. Forge Valley station had 60000 visitors 50/60 years ago. Time moves on. Cheeky face
  • Score: -1

3:52am Tue 29 Jul 14

Magicman! says...

Well then, a Tory government proposing to cut the railways back... bet you didn't see that one coming.

oh wait a minute...
Well then, a Tory government proposing to cut the railways back... bet you didn't see that one coming. oh wait a minute... Magicman!
  • Score: 0

6:43am Tue 29 Jul 14

Turnedoutniceagain says...

1:28pm Mon 28 Jul 14
Dr Brian says...

Rail use is at its highest levels than it has been in years. But what does this Government suggest. Close stations. Why not invest in promoting these stations - get people out of cars etc far more greener but of course the Tories and Lib Dems have not got any green policies!


Out of their cars and into 1 of the 4 trains per day!
1:28pm Mon 28 Jul 14 Dr Brian says... Rail use is at its highest levels than it has been in years. But what does this Government suggest. Close stations. Why not invest in promoting these stations - get people out of cars etc far more greener but of course the Tories and Lib Dems have not got any green policies! Out of their cars and into 1 of the 4 trains per day! Turnedoutniceagain
  • Score: 0

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